Yep, “MLB sued” is the flashiest news story today! Major League Baseball along with its players’ union are being sued over the decision of moving the All-Star Game from Georgia to Colorado.

The Job Creators Network is a conservative group representing small businesses featuring retired Home Depot co-founder Bernie Marcus as the founder, and are suing the MLB based on claims that the MLB violated a civil rights law with the relocation of the game.

The Job Creators Network argues that the league moved the game out of Atlanta for the sole purpose of punishing small business owners. In court, the group is requesting $100 million in damages for businesses and $1 billion in punitive damages.

Why the MLB Relocated the All-Star Game

About two months ago, the MLB announced that this year’s All-Star Game would no longer be taking place in Atlanta, but instead, Coors Field in Colorado would be the hosts.

This move came just a couple of days after Georgia Governor Brian Kemp signed a law that requires identification for mail voting as well as making it illegal to take food or water to voters waiting patiently in line. Had the Governor not done that the game would still be scheduled to occur in Atlanta.
MLB sued over moving all-star game

The MLB released a statement when they decided to move the game saying:

“Major League Baseball fundamentally supports voting rights for all Americans and opposes restrictions to the ballot box. In 2020, MLB became the first professional sports league to join the non-partisan Civic Alliance to help build a future in which everyone participates in shaping the United States. We proudly used our platform to encourage baseball fans and communities throughout our country to perform their civic duty and actively participate in the voting process. Fair access to voting continues to have our game’s unwavering support.”

Can the MLB Lose in Court?

Sorry Job Creators Network, but it looks like the MLB is going to have a solid case when they come across you in court. The small conservative group claims that thousands of hardworking men and women in the Atlanta area were banking on the proceeds for this year’s All-Star Game when the MLB took that away in the blink of an eye.

In addition, they claim they were forced to remove ads in the New York Times and Times Square which supposedly add up to over $1.6 million.

Jim Masteralexis, a sports law teacher at Western New England University says:

“There’s no constitutional or statutory right to profit from an All-Star Game that’s played in the vicinity of your business. No one has breached a contract with you. No one has violated federal law. Major League Baseball was actually exercising their constitutional right to speak on an important issue.”

The MLB took a stand and stood confidently for what they represent. Voting rights is something the MLB has made clear that they are passionate about.

At this time, I am proud to be a longtime fan of the MLB. They are representing both their players and audience extremely well in moving the All-Star Game just days following voting rights changes in Georgia. Perhaps, other sports leagues will make similar moves if something like this were to happen in the future.